Assignment 2 – collecting Re-Worked.

 

 

Process:

Tutors report to assignment 2:

2.Ashley Rosser

For my response to my tutors report (see above link) for Assignment two I decided to re-work it totally.

I decided to go with a subject more in line with Tony Ray Jones and his work on the English at play.

I also decided to go with photographs I took whilst in Australia, while on holiday I had intended to work on sections four and five anyway.

I also did this for two other reasons :

1. I wanted to use photographs that used my skill set from nearer that period of my learning.

2.  It was a time-saving measure.

Not Ideal I know but there you have it.

My subject is Australians at play.

I used mainly my 70 – 200 mm. lens and dealt with the harsh Australian sunshine as best I could.

The images are lightly processed and some are cropped to lessen unimportant dead space within the frame.

 

Research:

For this assignment I looked at Tony Ray Jones and his images of the English at play but turned it upside down, globally speaking and made it into Australians at play.

His style and subjects are what get my juices flowing.

They are well executed and very well framed.

As he explained to Creative Camera in 1968:

“I have tried to show the sadness and the humour in a gentle madness that prevails in a people. The situations are sometimes ambiguous and unreal, and the juxtaposition of elements seemingly unrelated, and the people are real. This, I hope helps to create a feeling of fantasy. Photography can be a mirror and reflect life as it is, but I also think that perhaps it is possible to walk, like Alice, though a Looking-Glass, and find another kind of world with the camera”.

I also watched a biography on Harry Benson which shows what is possible when you get really close to your subjects.

See my assessment of Harry Benson at this link:

https://ashley516543.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/harry-benson-shoot-first/

 

Photographs:

 

Analysis and reflection:

In keeping with T R Jones I tried to select shots that showed the humour and generosity of the Australian people.

The first image of the couple in the waterfall could only have been tighter if I was prepared to go swimming with my camera.

It shows what Aussies do when it gets hot, they find some water and go jump in it.

Image two shows Mum and Dad retrieving their children from a precarious spot, it also shows how families stick together and help each other out.

The sheer cliff face and the overhang together with the groups pose adds drama to the shot, it could have been taken a little closer but I think you’d lose the drama without the size of the cliff being apparent.

Photograph three shows a more relaxed family event.

I like this image for many reasons from the groups pose, the location and the eye contact between the man and woman.

The image of the man pointing is another of my favourites that I took, it shows Dad explaining where they used to live by pointing to Brisbane off in the distance.

I used a shallow depth of field to make the city skyline appear dream like, as if they’re looking into the past.

I did try changing the angle on these guy’s but I tended to lose the skyline before I could get all three back in frame.

The last two show how generous of their time Aussies are for charities.

The first is a Girl volunteer with the Australian Red Cross and the second but definitely more humorous are the forest fairies drawing people’s attention to environmental issues.

I only have two images here that equate even remotely to Harry Benson’s work and only one where I got the subject to crack a smile despite the torrential downpour we were in.

This I will try harder to do.

As for the technical aspects of this series I used a telephoto lens to compress space in all but one of this series.

I used this lens just because of the topography but also to make it seem like you’re in the scene yourself, a participant so to speak.

The effects you get at lower F stop numbers is really good and helped me show just enough of the back ground and foreground as was pertinent to the images and what I wanted the viewer  to focus on.

I think overall this went well, I don’t have so many shot’s with technical errors or things appearing in the frame which were unintended.

This is really good considering it will be some time before I can return to the land down under.

I spent three months down under and only encountered one homeless person so I don’t have many shots of the sadness that Jones and I have found in England.

I do however have a load of happy people images which leaves me with as positive an impression of Australians as they seem to portray.

I wish to go there again as the variety of scenery, flora and fauna is mind boggling.

 

200 mm. 1/500th. sec.  f 5  ISO 100

 

200 mm.  1/60th. sec.  f 5    ISO 100

200 mm.  1/400th. sec.  f 2.8   ISO 100

200 mm.  1/2500th. sec.  f 2.8   ISO 100

70 mm.  1/60th. sec.  f 8   ISO 3200

200 mm.   1/40th. sec.  f 8  ISO 400

 

 

 

Brief:

Create a series of between six and ten photographs from one of the following options, or a subject of your own choosing:
• Crowds
• Views
• Heads
Use the exercises from Part Two as a starting point to test out combinations of focal length, aperture and viewpoint for the set.

Decide upon a single format, either vertical or horizontal.

You should keep to the same combination throughout to lend coherence
to the series.
• Crowds make a great subject for photography, not least because they are so contemporary.

A city rush hour is a good place to start but events also offer great
opportunities to photograph the crowd rather than the event.

The foreshortened perspective of the telephoto lens will compress a crowd, fitting more bodies into the frame, but it can also be used to pick out an individual person.

A wide-angle lens can capture dynamic shots from within the action.
• If you choose to make a collection of views you need to be prepared to do some walking so keep the weight of your equipment to a minimum – you’ll walk further and see more.

A tripod will be important to allow you to select a combination of small aperture and slow shutter speed to ensure absolute sharpness throughout the frame.

The weather and time of day will be crucial, whether for urban or landscape
views.

A wide-angle lens is the usual choice but Ansel Adams also used a medium
telephoto to foreshorten the perspective, bringing the sky, distance and foreground closer together.
• Heads: Frame a ‘headshot’, cropping close around the head to avoid too much variety
in the backgrounds.

The light will be paramount and a reflector is a useful tool (you can ask the subject to hold it), throwing light up into the face, especially the eyes.
The classic headshot is buoyant but neutral which is quite difficult to achieve, but try to achieve a natural rather than an artificially posed look.
Assignment notes
Send your photographs to your tutor accompanied by assignment notes (500–1,000 words) containing the following:
• An introduction to your subject.
• A description of the combination of aperture, focal length and viewpoint you’ve used, and how they affect the images.
• An evaluation. You’ll want to evaluate the technical aspects of your assignment, but it’s also important to evaluate how well the series works as a whole.

When writing your evaluation, use the following structure: what worked well, what didn’t work so well and how the series might be improved in the future.
Include a link (or scanned pages) to any exercises from Part Two in your learning log that you’d like your tutor to comment on.
Reflection
Check your work against the assessment criteria for this course before you send it to your tutor.

Make some notes in your learning log about how well you believe your work
meets each criterion.
Your tutor may take a while to get back to you so carry on with the course while you’re waiting.

Advertisements

Assignment 2 – collecting Re-Worked.

Brief:

Create a series of between six and ten photographs from one of the following options, or a subject of your own choosing:
• Crowds
• Views
• Heads
Use the exercises from Part Two as a starting point to test out combinations of focal length, aperture and viewpoint for the set.

Decide upon a single format, either vertical or horizontal.

You should keep to the same combination throughout to lend coherence
to the series.
• Crowds make a great subject for photography, not least because they are so contemporary.

A city rush hour is a good place to start but events also offer great
opportunities to photograph the crowd rather than the event.

The foreshortened perspective of the telephoto lens will compress a crowd, fitting more bodies into the frame, but it can also be used to pick out an individual person.

A wide-angle lens can capture dynamic shots from within the action.
• If you choose to make a collection of views you need to be prepared to do some walking so keep the weight of your equipment to a minimum – you’ll walk further and see more.

A tripod will be important to allow you to select a combination of small aperture and slow shutter speed to ensure absolute sharpness throughout the frame.

The weather and time of day will be crucial, whether for urban or landscape
views.

A wide-angle lens is the usual choice but Ansel Adams also used a medium
telephoto to foreshorten the perspective, bringing the sky, distance and foreground closer together.
• Heads: Frame a ‘headshot’, cropping close around the head to avoid too much variety
in the backgrounds.

The light will be paramount and a reflector is a useful tool (you can ask the subject to hold it), throwing light up into the face, especially the eyes.
The classic headshot is buoyant but neutral which is quite difficult to achieve, but try to achieve a natural rather than an artificially posed look.
Assignment notes
Send your photographs to your tutor accompanied by assignment notes (500–1,000 words) containing the following:
• An introduction to your subject.
• A description of the combination of aperture, focal length and viewpoint you’ve used, and how they affect the images.
• An evaluation. You’ll want to evaluate the technical aspects of your assignment, but it’s also important to evaluate how well the series works as a whole.

When writing your evaluation, use the following structure: what worked well, what didn’t work so well and how the series might be improved in the future.
Include a link (or scanned pages) to any exercises from Part Two in your learning log that you’d like your tutor to comment on.
Reflection
Check your work against the assessment criteria for this course before you send it to your tutor.

Make some notes in your learning log about how well you believe your work
meets each criterion.
Your tutor may take a while to get back to you so carry on with the course while you’re waiting.

Tutors report to assignment 2:

2.Ashley Rosser

Process:

For my response to my tutors report for Assignment two I decided to re-work it totally.

I decided to go with a subject more in line with Tony Ray Jones and his work on the English at play.

I also decided to go with photographs I took whilst in Australia, while on holiday I had intended to work on sections four and five anyway.

I also did this for two other reasons :

1. I wanted to use photographs that used my skill set from nearer that period of my learning.

2.  It was a time-saving measure.

Not Ideal I know but there you have it.

My subject is Australians at play.

I used mainly my 70 – 200 mm. lens and dealt with the harsh Australian sunshine as best I could.

The images are lightly processed and some are cropped to lessen unimportant dead space within the frame.

 

Photographs:

200 mm. 1/500th. sec.  f 5  ISO 100

 

200 mm.  1/60th. sec.  f 5    ISO 100

200 mm.  1/400th. sec.  f 2.8   ISO 100

200 mm.  1/2500th. sec.  f 2.8   ISO 100

70 mm.  1/60th. sec.  f 8   ISO 3200

200 mm.   1/40th. sec.  f 8  ISO 400

 

Research:

For this assignment I looked at Tony Ray Jones and his images of the English at play but turned it upside down, globally speaking and made it into Australians at play.

His style and subjects are what get my juices flowing.

They are well executed and very well framed.

As he explained to Creative Camera in 1968:

“I have tried to show the sadness and the humour in a gentle madness that prevails in a people. The situations are sometimes ambiguous and unreal, and the juxtaposition of elements seemingly unrelated, and the people are real. This, I hope helps to create a feeling of fantasy. Photography can be a mirror and reflect life as it is, but I also think that perhaps it is possible to walk, like Alice, though a Looking-Glass, and find another kind of world with the camera”.

I also watched a biography on Harry Benson which shows what is possible when you get really close to your subjects.

See my assessment of Harry Benson at this link:

https://ashley516543.wordpress.com/2018/04/09/harry-benson-shoot-first/

Analysis:

In keeping with T R Jones I tried to select shots that showed the humour and generosity of the Australian people.

The first image of the couple in the waterfall could only have been tighter if I was prepared to go swimming with my camera.

It shows what Aussies do when it gets hot, they find some water and go jump in it.

Image two shows Mum and Dad retrieving their children from a precarious spot, it also shows how families stick together and help each other out.

The sheer cliff face and the overhang together with the groups pose adds drama to the shot, it could have been taken a little closer but I think you’d lose the drama without the size of the cliff being apparent.

Photograph three shows a more relaxed family event.

I like this image for many reasons from the groups pose, the location and the eye contact between the man and woman.

The image of the man pointing is another of my favourites that I took, it shows Dad explaining where they used to live by pointing to Brisbane off in the distance.

I used a shallow depth of field to make the city skyline appear dream like, as if they’re looking into the past.

I did try changing the angle on these guy’s but I tended to lose the skyline before I could get all three back in frame.

The last two show how generous of their time Aussies are for charities.

The first is a Girl volunteer with the Australian Red Cross and the second but definitely more humorous are the forest fairies drawing people’s attention to environmental issues.

I only have two images here that equate even remotely to Harry Benson’s work and only one where I got the subject to crack a smile despite the torrential downpour we were in.

This I will try harder to do.

As for the technical aspects of this series I used a telephoto lens to compress space in all but one of this series.

I used this lens just because of the topography but also to make it seem like you’re in the scene yourself, a participant so to speak.

The effects you get at lower F stop numbers is really good and helped me show just enough of the back ground and foreground as was pertinent to the images and what I wanted the viewer  to focus on.

I think overall this went well, I don’t have so many shot’s with technical errors or things appearing in the frame which were unintended.

This is really good considering it will be some time before I can return to the land down under.

Reflection:

I spent three months down under and only encountered one homeless person so I don’t have many shots of the sadness that Jones and I have found in England.

I do however have a load of happy people images which leaves me with as positive an impression of Australians as they seem to portray.

I wish to go there again as the variety of scenery, flora and fauna is mind boggling.

 

Assignment 2 Tutor Feedback

2.Ashley Rosser

Reflections:

This assessment from my tutor is more critical than the last.

Upon reflection I have to agree that the assignment does have the feel of an exercise than an assignment, more canned than an artistic response to the brief.

Were I do disagree is in his assessment of the subject matter, in the non photographic section of the community  as a whole they don’t remember what it took to take a photograph.

Heck, one of my younger co-workers didn’t know how to address an envelope he was so used to communicating by electronic means.

My experience while doing this subject backs up my theory, young people where fascinated with the process and thought it was weird.

I however have to agree that I failed to get it to appeal to a  neutral viewer and this I must remain vigilant of.

The viewers perception must always be at the forefront of my execution of ideas, this I will have endeavour to be constantly aware of in the future.

Corrective Actions:

I will endeavour to do more research etc.

I will be re-shooting this assignment with a different idea and Photographs.

Assignment 2 : Collecting

Brief :

Create a series of between six and ten photographs from one of the following options, or a subject of your own choosing:
• Crowds
• Views
• Heads
Use the exercises from Part Two as a starting point to test out combinations of focal length, aperture and viewpoint for the set.

Decide upon a single format, either vertical or horizontal.

You should keep to the same combination throughout to lend coherence
to the series.
• Crowds make a great subject for photography, not least because they are so contemporary.

A city rush hour is a good place to start but events also offer great
opportunities to photograph the crowd rather than the event.

The foreshortened perspective of the telephoto lens will compress a crowd, fitting more bodies into the frame, but it can also be used to pick out an individual person.

A wide-angle lens can capture dynamic shots from within the action.
• If you choose to make a collection of views you need to be prepared to do some walking so keep the weight of your equipment to a minimum – you’ll walk further and see more.

A tripod will be important to allow you to select a combination of
small aperture and slow shutter speed to ensure absolute sharpness throughout the frame.
The weather and time of day will be crucial, whether for urban or landscape views.
A wide-angle lens is the usual choice but Ansel Adams also used a medium telephoto to foreshorten the perspective, bringing the sky, distance and foreground closer together.
• Heads: Frame a ‘headshot’, cropping close around the head to avoid too much variety in the backgrounds.

The light will be paramount and a reflector is a useful tool (you
can ask the subject to hold it), throwing light up into the face, especially the eyes.
The classic headshot is buoyant but neutral which is quite difficult to achieve, but try to achieve a natural rather than an artificially posed look.

Introduction :

I mused over this Assignment for longer than it took to Photograph.
Do I do an assignment based on crowds, views and heads or do I step out onto a limb and try something different ?
Looking at collections I came across an article in the NY times about Henry Buhl and a collection of photographs he auctioned off in 2012, this was a collection of prints from such famous photographers as Stieglitz and Moholy-Nagy.
It consisted of nothing but hands.
“There are hands as gesture, hands as objects, hands as emotion,” said Denise Bethel, director of Sotheby’s photography department.
I didn’t want to copy others work and I wanted to tell a story but what ?
Today me and my friend went to the park, I to look for inspiration and he to burn through the last of a roll of 120 film.
The reactions of people in the park to his Large tripod and Bronica got me thinking, how many people outside the industry actually know how Photo’s used to be taken ?
So I decided to combine the hands theme and tell a story of what it used to take you to obtain an image.

Process :

I took several images hand-held of each major step of the process.
Using the widest aperture I could so as to try to isolate not just the subject, his hands; but I found I had to use various points of view to include just enough of the camera to tell the story.
A collection of images in sequence which I hoped would satisfy the brief and still be interesting and different.

Photograph’s :

55mm. f5.6 1/250th. sec. ISO 100

52mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

52mm. f5.6 1/100th. sec. ISO 100

35mm. f4.5 1/500th. sec. ISO 100

36mm. f4.8 1/320th. sec. ISO 100

36mm. f4.8 1/60th. sec. ISO 100

36mm. f4.8 1/60th. sec. ISO 100

34mm. f4.5 1/400th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/250th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/320th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/400th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/200th. sec. ISO 100

55mm. f5.6 1/320th. sec. ISO 100

36mm. f4.8 1/320th. sec. ISO 100

50mm. f5.6 1/60th. sec. ISO 100

Built in flash.

 

 

 

Evaluation :

Overall the series achieved what I set out to do, a collection of hand Images that portrayed a story.
The various viewpoints were necessary to show the process of photography of yester year.
I am still plagued by this kit lens not giving a shallow enough depth of field in order to isolate my subject.
I may revisit this subject when I have a faster lens.

 

Reflection :

I think I satisfied the brief, it is a collection and the basic format was maintained throughout.
The subject matter would, I think be of interest to those whose only exposure to photography has been during the digital age.
The reaction of those around us was mainly of curiosity, children especially wondered what the big box was.
As for the assessment criteria I think I satisfied the technical and visual skills part.
I also believe I satisfied the quality of outcome, demonstration of creativity and the context sections.
Could I do better or improve, sure I can and will.
As always I view myself as a work in progress.